Training rca

Jess

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I posted a few days ago about Training a new rca. They decided to force me into training when other regulars want a sub. I have really bad anxiety and panic attacks over small daily changes. I just can’t help it..

I come in to work around 730 today and case my route. I don’t mark any packages I just put them in order and pull down. I’ve been having to break up my route into 2 parts due to the amount of packages around 250-350

I had my first part loaded up in the truck. As I was leaving they decided to tell me I had a sub to train. they are not riding in the LLVs with us. I say okay well.. Mail is cased and I’m leaving. I guess she is suppose to follow me.

so another carrier decides to show her how to case dps and mark packages on her route. Vs following me around.

fast fwd to Return to office: I get told I need to call the union for a pdi because I refuse to train her. Mind you.. no supervisor was in the office and it’s just carriers saying this. I never said that. all I said was “ no one said anything about training, but I guess she is just following me in her car”

They are forcing me to train. Other carriers said they want a sub..oh and they are having another carrier train for 3 days and me for 1 day now. I suggested why doesn’t she deliver packages for 3 days and case for 3 days (we have package runners, all our routes are heavy)

so here we are.. I’m already a 2080 issue, now have to take extra steps to train.. I know for a fact nothing on the sheet in the covid stand up talk will be done. Walkie talkies , no extra LLV.. How am I suppose to social distance and teach in a case. I’m gonna lose it..
 

Rcflyn

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I’m not entirely sure where to go with this, but from what your saying, I’d flat out refuse to train in your situation. If this sub isn’t going to be mine, I’m not training them. There is absolutely no reason to train a sub on “my” route, just for them to be somebody else’s sub. They’ll need to learn the “other” case and “route” anyways, no point in them learning “my route”. Let the regular who’s getting the sub do the training. There’s no reason to train a newbie a route they will rarely run. It’s hard enough training them the route they will be running. Don’t complicate it more by training them a route they won’t run, just so they have to learn the one they will be running.....
 

btdtret

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Jess -- " They decided to force me into training when other regulars want a sub. "

-- Have you asked manglement: " Why do I have to train someone else's sub -- why can't they do it themselves?

-- Ask the same of you Assistant District Representative.

-- If need by, remind both that the ELM's Section 711.13 Responsibility ( for Training and Development ) which says:

- Responsibility for the training and development of postal employees is shared by the individual employee ( the sub's regular - ? ), his or her supervisor or manager, and the organization. ( nothing in there about training a sub for someone else - IMHO )

-- Are you doing a better job in training new RCA's than other carriers?

" I have really bad anxiety and panic attacks over small daily changes. I just can’t help it..

-- Could be the USPS is trying to help you overcome your anxiety and panic attacks by making daily changes -- but I doubt it!

-- Call EAP to help with the stress.
 

Voglio-il mio

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I’m not entirely sure where to go with this, but from what your saying, I’d flat out refuse to train in your situation. If this sub isn’t going to be mine, I’m not training them. There is absolutely no reason to train a sub on “my” route, just for them to be somebody else’s sub. They’ll need to learn the “other” case and “route” anyways, no point in them learning “my route”. Let the regular who’s getting the sub do the training. There’s no reason to train a newbie a route they will rarely run. It’s hard enough training them the route they will be running. Don’t complicate it more by training them a route they won’t run, just so they have to learn the one they will be running.....
Sorry I disagree to a certain extent! In our office when an RCA is being trained for one of the larger routes we always have their initial training started on a smaller route. It is much more important for them to develop good mail handling habits than it is to become overwhelmed. Learning the process at a slower, smaller scale will not only provide a better education but it will also provide better initial confidence in being able to handle the job. After becoming proficient at the smaller route and developing their own mail handling and delivery system this is when they can be moved on to their primary (larger) route. Hopefully now their confidence is much better and the mail handling process has become more routine, so when they start handling the higher volume (longer days) it wont be both the process and the volume they will be dealing with at the same time. Once you know the process and become proficient at delivering, learning a new case is just a thing that will come with time and repetition.

By the way all of our RCA's are capable of running any route in the office as a result of this philosophy, therefore we rarely have difficulty covering leave time.
 
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rhdriver

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Once you know the process and become proficient at delivering, learning a new case is just a thing that will come with time and repetition.

By the way all of our RCA's are capable of running any route in the office as a result of this philosophy, therefore we rarely have difficulty covering leave time.
This sounds like a brilliant way to train a new sub! Sadly, I've never seen it done that way. The mentality always seem to be to put the new person on the route they will be working on, train them as quickly as possible on that route, hurry hurry hurry, have to get this person up and running and able to work ASAP (probably management is thinking the sooner the better so they don't have to deliver any more than absolutely necessary). Often times--to management's stupid surprise--that's when they quit!!
 

Voglio-il mio

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This sounds like a brilliant way to train a new sub! Sadly, I've never seen it done that way. The mentality always seem to be to put the new person on the route they will be working on, train them as quickly as possible on that route, hurry hurry hurry, have to get this person up and running and able to work ASAP (probably management is thinking the sooner the better so they don't have to deliver any more than absolutely necessary). Often times--to management's stupid surprise--that's when they quit!!
While training the new RCA on another RCA's Primary route (smaller route), that RCA will cover the new RCA (future) primary route. To limit hard feelings, the Regular Carrier for the new RCA primary route will take some time off to offset the misplaced RCA's loss. All the RCA's understand that we are a team and we did the same for them when they first started. We always attempt to have a second RCA working on a day that the new one is working so that assistance can be given if needed to make dispatch. We don't leave our new RCA's hanging out to dry, they know we are there for support and tend to excel because of that. Another thing we do is after they come in to do their ride along and are waiting to go to the Academy they don't just sit at home. They come in and run packages for the two routes they will be involved with, initial training route & primary route. On the Regular Carriers side of that the additional help offsets the time spent towards training.

There are many things we do that are unique that work really well. Our PM listens to us Carriers and buys in to our ideas, to the point of sticking their neck out. The PM's understanding of spending payroll up front to train properly will actually save payroll in the end. Our turnover is usually not from RCA's quitting but from them moving on to better opportunities at a different Post Office.
 

BeatsAll-IEverSeen

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While training the new RCA on another RCA's Primary route (smaller route), that RCA will cover the new RCA (future) primary route. To limit hard feelings, the Regular Carrier for the new RCA primary route will take some time off to offset the misplaced RCA's loss. All the RCA's understand that we are a team and we did the same for them when they first started.
Let me understand you: regular carriers in your office have to forfeit an earned benefit (leave) in order to "limit hard feelings" when training a new RCA because you and everyone else has devised a system that violates the contract? No way would I ever pressure/encourage/force upon anyone a scheme that mandates they give up leave to offset loss of wages for someone else.

If your PM has a blank check when it comes to training hours as you describe, then the philosophy and approach you are so proud of does not need to be applied to a route other than the primary: simply feed the RCA the primary route in small enough pieces as necessary and let the confidence build from there -- the whole system you describe is non-contractual, wasteful of resources and disrespects the earned benefit of leave. Why should a regular be forced to bear the cost of training a sub???? That cost is born by the USPS, not the rural carrier.

I certainly don't think RCAs should be "hung out to dry." I worked many off-the-clock hours helping those that were hired for my route. But my decision to do that was voluntary and the truth is, being an RCA is always rough and overwhelming at the outset. No one gets through it without at least one panic attack or a good cry. Baby people too much in the beginning and they'll develop unrealistic expectations very quickly.
 

Voglio-il mio

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Let me understand you: regular carriers in your office have to forfeit an earned benefit (leave) in order to "limit hard feelings" when training a new RCA because you and everyone else has devised a system that violates the contract? No way would I ever pressure/encourage/force upon anyone a scheme that mandates they give up leave to offset loss of wages for someone else.

If your PM has a blank check when it comes to training hours as you describe, then the philosophy and approach you are so proud of does not need to be applied to a route other than the primary: simply feed the RCA the primary route in small enough pieces as necessary and let the confidence build from there -- the whole system you describe is non-contractual, wasteful of resources and disrespects the earned benefit of leave. Why should a regular be forced to bear the cost of training a sub???? That cost is born by the USPS, not the rural carrier.

I certainly don't think RCAs should be "hung out to dry." I worked many off-the-clock hours helping those that were hired for my route. But my decision to do that was voluntary and the truth is, being an RCA is always rough and overwhelming at the outset. No one gets through it without at least one panic attack or a good cry. Baby people too much in the beginning and they'll develop unrealistic expectations very quickly.
I'll be brief because you sound like one of those Grievance sluts! You must work in a toxic office to come across the way you have in your response believe me when I say I'm so sorry for you!

First of all we are not mandated to use (leave) we volunteer the time to take one for the team. Second nobody is forfeiting anything, if you have time off and are not working but getting paid for it you must be on leave.

No, sorry no blank checks involved just the balls to stick their azz out there to have it chewed on a little bit. Most payroll restrictions are only in place to protect everybody's bonuses up and down the ranks. The hours are there to be had if you are willing to put up with the teeth marks on your back side.

No contract violations, everyone's working, the more experienced RCA's is covering a route for a Carrier that is on leave. You want to talk about contract violations "I worked many off-the-clock hours helping those that were hired for my route." That is an offence that you could be terminated for!

What you missing about this is that we work as a TEAM, (PM, Carriers and Clerks) we have no us against them, we do our jobs do them safely and go home bringing no stress with us!
 

marked

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Your system is likely not available to the majority. In my office, sub get three days to train on their route, period. No bonus days running parcels. They do not even get "trained" on additional routes. They're just tossed onto whatever route as needed.

Congrats on your program, it's not repeatable for the rest of us however.
 

Old Fart

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Sorry I disagree to a certain extent! In our office when an RCA is being trained for one of the larger routes we always have their initial training started on a smaller route. It is much more important for them to develop good mail handling habits than it is to become overwhelmed. Learning the process at a slower, smaller scale will not only provide a better education but it will also provide better initial confidence in being able to handle the job. After becoming proficient at the smaller route and developing their own mail handling and delivery system this is when they can be moved on to their primary (larger) route. Hopefully now their confidence is much better and the mail handling process has become more routine, so when they start handling the higher volume (longer days) it wont be both the process and the volume they will be dealing with at the same time. Once you know the process and become proficient at delivering, learning a new case is just a thing that will come with time and repetition.

By the way all of our RCA's are capable of running any route in the office as a result of this philosophy, therefore we rarely have difficulty covering leave time.
We do the exact same in our offices. Because it works best for us. Our RCA's are trained on all routes, so leave is covered routinely.
 

Rural Runner

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I would have to respectfully disagree with training somebody on a route that is not their primary. Even if it is a heavy route, it is going to be their route, atleast until they have an opportunity to re-do the matrix. Maybe it's just me, but I am more of a "throw them straight into the fire" kind of guy. If they really want this job, and they need the money, they will tough it out. If not, they are a waste of time anyways. I learned on the heaviest route in the office. It sucked. But then as I started doing other routes, they were cake. It shows them that it CAN get better, as opposed to them thinking that it only gets harder. It makes for a better sub. I just wouldn't waste a days pay, and a non-primary regulars time, on somebody who may not stick around anyways.
 
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Voglio-il mio

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I would have to respectfully disagree with training somebody on a route that is not their primary. Even if it is a heavy route, it is going to be their route, at least until they have an opportunity to re-do the matrix. Maybe it's just me, but I am more of a "throw them straight into the fire" kind of guy. If they really want this job, and they need the money, they will tough it out. If not, they are a waste of time anyways. I learned on the heaviest route in the office. It sucked. But then as I started doing other routes, they were cake. It makes for a better sub. I just wouldn't waste a days pay, and a non-primary regulars time, on somebody who may not stick around anyways.
As far back as I can remember we have never had a RCA fail, we have had some that have taken longer to be totally successful. I also respect your opinion, but all I'm saying is with the flow of applicants being as lite as it is, this is a way to help make what you get as successful as possible. All I can say is that it works extremely well for us and there is no real inconvenience for anyone in the office.
 

ctrural2

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Sorry I disagree to a certain extent! In our office when an RCA is being trained for one of the larger routes we always have their initial training started on a smaller route. It is much more important for them to develop good mail handling habits than it is to become overwhelmed. Learning the process at a slower, smaller scale will not only provide a better education but it will also provide better initial confidence in being able to handle the job. After becoming proficient at the smaller route and developing their own mail handling and delivery system this is when they can be moved on to their primary (larger) route. Hopefully now their confidence is much better and the mail handling process has become more routine, so when they start handling the higher volume (longer days) it wont be both the process and the volume they will be dealing with at the same time. Once you know the process and become proficient at delivering, learning a new case is just a thing that will come with time and repetition.

By the way all of our RCA's are capable of running any route in the office as a result of this philosophy, therefore we rarely have difficulty covering leave time.
Sorry, I disagree. The new sub should be learning the route he/she will be assigned to. They now have 40-plus hours of training time, so can learn case, line-of-travel, etc, without being overwelmed. Reg can take the time to ensure they know what is going on on their route and how it is run. Kind of silly to train on a route that sub may never deliver
 

Rcflyn

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Sorry I disagree to a certain extent! In our office when an RCA is being trained for one of the larger routes we always have their initial training started on a smaller route. It is much more important for them to develop good mail handling habits than it is to become overwhelmed. Learning the process at a slower, smaller scale will not only provide a better education but it will also provide better initial confidence in being able to handle the job. After becoming proficient at the smaller route and developing their own mail handling and delivery system this is when they can be moved on to their primary (larger) route. Hopefully now their confidence is much better and the mail handling process has become more routine, so when they start handling the higher volume (longer days) it wont be both the process and the volume they will be dealing with at the same time. Once you know the process and become proficient at delivering, learning a new case is just a thing that will come with time and repetition.

By the way all of our RCA's are capable of running any route in the office as a result of this philosophy, therefore we rarely have difficulty covering leave time.
Ok, I completely understand where your coming from, and I also agree with what your saying...
One of the things I’ve said since I took on my 43k route (2nd biggest in my office) is “I’m so glad I had the opportunity to learn the aux route first (it was my main route for 6 years (along with working a real full time job 40-60 hours a week, plus 9.33-17 hours a week on aux route). By the time my 43k came available, I was comfortable with postal policies, and I basically knew everything I needed to know to take over my 43k.... since I took over my 43k, I’ve always said, “every sub that steps foot into any office NEEDS TO LEARN AN AUX ROUTE before they’re thrown into a K route.....”. I honestly think, had I started on my K route, I’d have walked out.... my old aux route taught me everything I needed to know to become what I am today.... shortly after I won the bid on my route, I only got the “old 3 days training and your on your own” routine. I was completely overwhelmed. And I kept saying “had I not learned what I did with the aux route, I’d have walked away had I been thrown to the dogs on this route to begin with”.

So I agree with what your saying, but my route being a 43k, I still stand firm with what I originally said, but I have to agree with the user who said “some offices, that just don’t work”......

I agree with you, but I still think (since it just don’t work in some offices), someone else training won’t work..... maybe, if I had an H route, 5 or 6 hours a day route, I’d agree to train them before they moved to a bigger route... I guess alls I’m saying is “no way will I train somebody on my K route to give them to another route”.
 
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