Heat in LLV

Gotrope

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That would be a dangerous environment for a Saharan lizard. No amount of hydration makes 150˚ safe for a rural carrier. Throw a little humidity, underlying health conditions and 150+ packages into the equation and you got a recipe for disaster.

"High environmental temperatures can be dangerous to your body. In the range of 90˚ and 105˚F, you can experience heat cramps and exhaustion. Between 105˚ and 130˚F, heat exhaustion is more likely. You should limit your activities at this range. An environmental temperature over 130˚F often leads to heatstroke."
Just received this email from our county supervisor 🤣🤣🤣🤣
Here are some tips for keeping your pet safe from the heat:
  • Never leave your pet in a parked car: Even cracking a window won’t protect your pets. It is against the law in California and could be punishable by a fine or imprisonment. A car can reach 120 degrees in just minutes; even if the windows are slightly open the car can still reach 102 degrees. A dog's normal temperature is 101.5 degrees; at 120 degrees your pet can suffer from heat exhaustion and die and at 107 degrees brain damage occurs.


it was 131F in my vehicle today.
 

rhdriver

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Just received this email from our county supervisor 🤣🤣🤣🤣
Here are some tips for keeping your pet safe from the heat:
  • Never leave your pet in a parked car: Even cracking a window won’t protect your pets. It is against the law in California and could be punishable by a fine or imprisonment. A car can reach 120 degrees in just minutes; even if the windows are slightly open the car can still reach 102 degrees. A dog's normal temperature is 101.5 degrees; at 120 degrees your pet can suffer from heat exhaustion and die and at 107 degrees brain damage occurs.


it was 131F in my vehicle today.
Wow, makes you feel all warm and fuzzy doesn't it--fuzzy-brained with heat exhaustion, and, of course we know where the WARM part comes from--the floor boards of our vehicles! Even dogs get better treatment than we do!

I seriously believe USPS is trying to kill us, one way or another! Pick your poison: "no, you're not getting your day off this week either!" (although management always gets a day off each week :mad:); extreme heat; "death by dog food" package avalanche, etc. There's no end to management's creativity!
 

drakeME

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If it was "engine heat" coming through, why is it that you can get near frostbitten toes in winter? Put your hands on the block in front of you in winter, it's not warm at all. I think it's more ambient heat, especially from asphalt being absorbed below than it is the engine. I could be wrong of course. Engine temps (supposedly) remain mostly consistent season to season.

Has anyone tried any form of heat shield/padding for the floor? Those pvc pipe vents are all the rage in our office this summer. Better than nothing for sure.
 

DB.Cooper

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If carriers can be creative enuf to invent gutter pipe vent systems to help a bit with LLV air flow.... why can't the USPS come up with something as good or better???? Maybe @rhdriver is right.... they're just trying to kill us off.... 😳
 

Boston65

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If it was "engine heat" coming through, why is it that you can get near frostbitten toes in winter? Put your hands on the block in front of you in winter, it's not warm at all. I think it's more ambient heat, especially from asphalt being absorbed below than it is the engine. I could be wrong of course. Engine temps (supposedly) remain mostly consistent season to season.

Has anyone tried any form of heat shield/padding for the floor? Those pvc pipe vents are all the rage in our office this summer. Better than nothing for sure.

Take an ordinary Welcome mat used to wipe your feet and lay it down on the floor between the seat and mail tray. Mat needs to be a good thick one. It will reduce heat somewhat.
 
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